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Tuesday, August 5, 2008

Now you can read it!

Here is the text of the article in the previous post:

Published in the Anaconda Standard, Sunday morning, April 6, 1902.

RECEIVES FATAL INJURY

MICHAEL BONES CRUSHED AT THE
WASHOE SMELTER

CORONER TO HOLD INQUEST

Caught Between Engine and Iron Post – Still Alive When Removed From Terrible Position.
Dies at the Hospital.

While endeavoring to get out of the way of the small compressed air locomotives at the new Washoe smelter yesterday afternoon Michael Bones was caught between the engine and an iron post and was fatally crushed.
When extricated from his terrible position Bones was still alive. He was taken to St. Ann’s hospital, and though everything possible was done to prolong his life, he died shortly after arriving at the hospital.
Bones was employed at the works as a smelterman. He had been in Anaconda for about a year. He resided at No. 804 East Third Street. He was 23 years of age. John Golden and Mrs. F. B. Dolan of this city were his cousins and a sister, Mrs. J. F. O’Donnell, resides in Helena.
Soon after Bones’ death Coroner Hughes was notified and took possession of the body. An inquest will be held today. Coroner Hughes has investigated the matter, and eye witnesses of the affair will testify at the inquest today.
The accident is said to have occurred just as Bones was about to leave one of the smelter buildings. It is thought that in his haste to get out of the way of the approaching engine Bones did not see where he was stepping until it was too late to move. His injuries were internal.
Despite his short residence in Anaconda Mr. Bones had a wide circle of friends here, and the news of his sudden death was a great shock to them. He was known as a young man of industrious habits. It is probable that no arrangements for the funeral will be made until after the coroner’s inquest.

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